This famous speaker didn’t speak deceitfully…

1Th 2:2  But even after that we had suffered before, and were shamefully entreated, as ye know, at Philippi, we were bold in our God to speak unto you the gospel of God with much contention. 

1Th 2:3  For our exhortation was not of deceit, nor of uncleanness, nor in guile: 

1Th 2:4  But as we were allowed of God to be put in trust with the gospel, even so we speak; not as pleasing men, but God, which trieth our hearts. 

1Th 2:5  For neither at any time used we flattering words, as ye know, nor a cloke of covetousness; God is witness:

1 Thessalonians 2: 2-5

Wow!­­

What a statement of intentions, actions, and words, Paul the Apostle writes here in his 1st letter to the Thessalonians.

I want you to imagine that you have told people a message (which in our physical experience is WORDS placed in a particular order) and some of the people you were speaking to then tried to stone you, put you in jail, and kicked you out of town. Furthermore, I want you to place yourself inside 1st century Greece, and think about how powerful the words Paul spoke, that people became enraged and tried to kill him. Essentially this is hand-to-hand contesting, not some far away sniper or drone attempt. Those who wanted to kill Paul were seriously mad.

Conversely, the words that Paul speaks to others do not just affect the people receiving his message by listening, it affects Paul himself, the speaker. Let’s review the first verse in our discussion,

1Th 2:2  But even after that we had suffered before, and were shamefully entreated, as ye know, at Philippi, we were bold in our God to speak unto you the gospel of God with much contention.

                                        — 1 Thessalonians 2:2

 Notice how Paul says that even though they suffered before in Philippi, “…we were bold in our God to speak unto you the gospel of God with much contention.”  The Gospel was so important and so powerful that when Paul spoke of it, he was emboldened by God to speak no matter how much opposition there was to it.  As you think about what you know of the history of the Holy Bible and Christianity, people – Christians – have been bold enough to die for the Gospel since the resurrection of Christ.  Furthermore, Paul provides us insight into his well-being through this perilous journey spreading the Gospel across the world when he says,

1Th 2:4  But as we were allowed of God to be put in trust with the gospel, even so we speak; not as pleasing men, but God, which trieth our hearts.

                                        — 1 Thessalonians 2:4

Paul says openly that his heart is being tried. It is a gargantuan challenge to spread the gospel in the face of persecution almost everywhere he travelled.  Think for a second, wouldn’t it be easy for Paul to ‘change’ the message so that he wouldn’t be persecuted so hard? Stop the hardship. Make a deal with local authorities to preach a message that would not challenge their authority? Of course it would be! Paul the Apostle, however, clearly states that he did not come to please men but God. Paul came to tell the truth, not a deceitful version of the truth that Jesus Christ imparted to him.  As Paul writes in verses 3 and 5?

1Th 2:3  For our exhortation was not of deceit, nor of uncleanness, nor in guile:

1Th 2:5  For neither at any time used we flattering words, as ye know, nor a cloke of covetousness; God is witness:

                                             — 1 Thessalonians 2: 3, 5

Ladies and gentlemen, this is proof that the words we speak can literally change the world – especially the ‘world’ around us and that we physically encounter and influence.  Therefore, if you want to change the world; if you want to proclaim an impactful and powerful message, do so with integrity, truth, and boldness in God.

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